Overview


What are Triggers?

From Google Tag Manager Help:

“Tags fire in response to events. In Google Tag Manager, a trigger listens to your web page or mobile app for certain types of events like form submissions, button clicks, or page views. The trigger tells the tag to fire when the specified event is detected. Every tag must have at least one trigger in order to fire.

Triggers are evaluated when code on the page or app is executed, and associated tags are fired or blocked when the trigger conditions are met.”


What are Variables?

From Google Tag Manager Help:

“A variable is a named placeholder for a value that will change, such as a product name, a price value, or a date.”


ACME Custom Triggers & Variables

The Google Tag Manager (GTM) Tenant Setup covers custom triggers and variables ACME supports that are recommended to configure in Google Tag Manager. This document serves to explain each of these with examples.


Additional Helpful resources

        Google Tag Manager Debug Mode


ACME Custom Triggers & Variables Explained


VirtualPageview

Triggers when pages are rendered/viewed without a standard browser page load, such as the checkout cart and event forms.


Example: Checkout Cart

        Page Title: “Your Order”

        Event Action: “Calendar::DateSelected”

        Event Category: “Calendar”

        Event Label: “Feb 14, 2020”


Example: Event Form

        Page Title: “Response Forms”


Interaction Trigger

Triggers when a user performs a tracked interaction on a page. The examples below are currently supported by ACME:


Example: Visitor clicks “Tickets” for the event “Admissions”

        Event Action: “Add”

        Event Category: “Event”

        Event Label: “Admissions”


Example: Visitor selects a date on the calendar

        Event Action: “Calendar::DateSelected”

        Event Category: “Calendar”

        Event Label: “Feb 14, 2020”


Example: Visitor clicks “Join” for a membership

        Event Action: “Membership::Join”

        Event Category: “Membership”

        Event Label: “Contributor (5a0530ddf71d1a05637a5cec)”


Example: Visitor selects a different membership offering in the cart

        Event Action: “Membership::Offering::Select::Contributor”

        Event Category: “Membership”

        Event Label: “Two year::Contributor”


Example: Visitor continues to a different step in checkout

        Membership

        Event Action: “Step”

        Event Category: “Checkout”

        Event Label: “MemberInfo”

        Checkout Step: 2

        Payment

        Event Action: “Step”

        Event Category: “Checkout”

        Event Label: “Payment”

        Checkout Step: 3

        Review

        Event Action: “Step”

        Event Category: “Checkout”

        Event Label: “Review”

        Checkout Step: 4


Example: Visitor taps to complete checkout

        Event Action: “Checkout”

        Event Category: “Checkout”

        Event Label: “Order (100114511)”   (Note: This is the Order Number)

        Checkout Step: 5


Example: Visitor receives confirmation of order completion

        Event Action: “Purchase::Complete”

        Event Category: “Purchase”

        Event Label: “100114511” (Note: This is the Order Number)

        Note: A single item purchased will be returned in this payload. It is important to check the Product Triggers to see each unique item purchased (see below)


Product Trigger

Triggers when a product is successfully purchased. If multiple items are purchased, you will see multiple Product triggers returned with the confirmation page.


Example of a General Admission ticket purchase

        Product Category: “General Admission/Ticket”

        Product Brand: “Admissions”

        Product Id: <EVENT ID>

        Product Variant: “Ticket”

        Product Name: “Adult”

        Price: “2.00”

        Quantity: “2”


Example of a Standard ticket purchase

        Product Category: “Standard/Ticket”

        Product Brand: “Sailing”

        Product Id: <EVENT ID>

        Product Variant: “Ticket”

        Product Name: “Adult”

        Price: “100.00”

        Quantity: “1”


Example of an Add-on purchased with a Standard ticket

        Product Category: “Standard/Add-on”

        Product Brand: “Sailing”

        Product Id: <ADD-ON ID>

        Product Variant: “Add-On”

        Product Name: “Event Add-On”

        Price: “1.00”

        Quantity: “2”


Example of a Donation purchase

        Product Category: “Donation”

        Product Id: <DONATION ID>

        Product Name: “$10 Donation”

        Price: “10.00”


Example of a Membership purchase

        Product Category: “Contributor”

        Product Id: <MEMBERSHIP ID>

        Product Variant: “individual&Family”

        Product Name: “MembershipPurchase”

        Price: “150.00”